Not a Plant God? Don’t Lose Hope…

By: Natasha Visnack

Some Storm students have super powers. While they aren’t defeating evil villains or saving helpless civilians, these students are nonetheless the topic of envy and admiration among their peers. Their powers create growth and life in anything they touch. Well, more specifically, any plant they touch.

We all know people that can make plants grow by simply glancing at them. While the rest of us regularly kill our tiny supermarket succulents in less than a week, some people have entire forests of orchids and bonsai trees growing in their bedroom. These so-called plant gods have a seemingly magical touch that we mortals simply don’t possess. 

Luckily, two plant gurus, Camille Yarmo and McKenna Shirle, have shed some light on being good plant parents by recalling their favorite house plants and how to properly care for them.

First up is a Jade plant. 

“The Jade plant has very thick, bulbous leaves, which are dark green. It almost looks like a tiny-tree,” said Shirle. 

Jade plants have extensive lifespans, with some living long enough to be passed down through generations. Jade plants also have an allegedly calm vibe. 

“It’s very go with the flow and can handle quite a bit,” said Shirle. 

Jade plants require direct sunlight and regular watering. The only difficult part about caring for a Jade plant is its need for consistently moist soil. When watering your Jade plant it’s important to let the top 1 to 2 inches of the soil dry completely before adding more water. If the plant is overwatered, it will be in danger of developing root rot, a condition that will kill the plant. So if overwatering is a tendency of yours, the Jade plant might not be the right plant for you.

Thankfully Shirle also recommends a plant that is easier to care for. 

“A pothos plant is relatively easy to take care of since it can handle basically any condition.” Shirle said. . Pothos plants are similar to Jade plants in that they both thrive in direct sunlight. Unlike the Jade plant however, pothos plants can be kept in darker environments and are not particular about watering. They can be kept in anything from dry soil to vases of water. 

“The pothos plant has medium sized, waxy-like leaves, which are slightly heart shaped and a lighter green color,” said Shirle. “It’s very full at its base, but thins out as different stems grow downwards.” This plant can add a beautiful earthy element to any household or bedroom. According to Shirle, it has an energetic personality thanks to how easily it grows.

   Although dark green plants like the jade plant and the pothos plant can add a nice touch of dark color to a room, many people enjoy a splash of color in their plants. According to Camille Yarmo, the hoya plant can sprout small flower clusters. These star shaped flowers are typically white and pink, can but come in yellows, purples, and oranges. They provide a pretty spot of color against the plants’ dark green leaves. These leaves are thicker, waxy-ish leaves that are vaguely almond shaped. 

“Keep it in a bright area but with indirect sunlight,” said Yarmo. “In the summer and spring you should water them once a week, but in the fall and winter every other week is good.” Like the Jade plant, the Hoya plant is sensitive to overwatering, so it’s important to keep it in a well draining pot. This will prevent excess water build up and keep the plant from getting root rot.”

Armed with our newfound knowledge, those of us not as gifted with plant care will be able to keep our leafy friends alive a little longer. Although we will still look at those with a superhuman plant touch with awe, hopefully we’ll now be a little more versed in the world of plants.

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